Ofer þe Ea and Þruge þe Ƿood

From The Anglish (Anglisc) Wiki

The New-England Boy's Song about Thanksgiving Day — though you might know it as Over the River and Through the Wood(s) — is a poem written by Lydia Maria Child (1802–1880) in 1844 about Thanksgiving.
The song has been made Anglish, though some words were kept not; these words were marked as such.

The Writ in English Spelling[edit]

Over the ea, and through the wood,
To eldfather's house we go;
the horse knows the way to fare the sleigh
through the white and drifted snow.

Over the ea, and through the wood,
To eldfather's house away!
We would not stop for doll or top,
For 'tis Thanksyeafing Day.

Over the ea, and through the wood—
Oh, how the wind does blow!
It stings the toes and bites the nose
As over the ground we go.

Over the ea, and through the wood—
And straight through the barnyard yate,
We seem to go overly slow,
It is so hard to wait!

Over the ea, and through the wood—
When eldmother sees us come,
She will say, "O, dear, the children are here,
Bring a pie for everyone."

Over the ea, and through the wood—
Now eldmother's cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun! Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin pie!


The Writ in Anglish Spelling[edit]

Ofer þe ea, and þruge þe ƿood,
To eldfaðer's huse ƿe go;
Þe hors knoƿs þe ƿag to fare þe sleig
Þruge þe hƿite and drifted snoƿ.

Ofer þe ea, and þruge þe ƿood,
To eldfaðer's huse aƿag!
Ƿe ƿuld not stop for doll or top,
For 'tis Þanksgeefing Dag.

Ofer þe ea, and þruge þe ƿood—
Oh, hu þe ƿind does bloƿ!
It stings þe toes and bites þe nose
As ofer þe grund ƿe go.

Ofer þe ea, and þruge þe ƿood—
And straigt þruge þe barn gate ƿide,
Ƿe seem to go oferlig sloƿ,
It is so hard to bide!

Ofer þe ea, and þruge þe ƿood—
Hƿen eldmoðer sees us cum,
Sce ƿill sag, "O, dear, þe cildren are here,
Bring a pie for eferigone."

Ofer þe ea, and þruge þe ƿood—
Nu eldmoðer's cap I spie!
Hurrah for þe fun! Is þe pudding done?
Hurrah for þe pumpkin pie!